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Updated on Wednesday, September 11, 2013

#1093

OVERHEARD:
Froshling: I think the "Math building" is the ugly one.

16 comments

  1. Our building may be ugly, but our people are beautiful!

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  2. I think the quotes should be around "ugly one"

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  3. The building is NOT ugly. It is a tremendous bastion of concrete and rubbarb. All those who enter it will learn the ancient and sometimes arcane art of Mathematics. If you ascend to the top two floors, you may even become one of the wizards of the fort, writing concise symbolic statements of unimaginable power. That is to say, unimaginable iff you have not yet bathed in the glory of pointless topology over rank 3 manifolds embedded in a semisimple Renson Category of type 3.

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    1. tl;dr don't go into the math building

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    2. It's rebar, not rubbarb. What the hell is rubbarb? Even if you meant the plant that would be rhubarb.

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  4. The math building is ugly. I'm a mathie and love math, but MC is freaking ugly.

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    1. agreed. mathie here too. At least they did something right with M3.

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  5. The MC is a fortress of Math and Computers, it's fucking beautiful and badass.

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  6. The MC is a fortress of Math and Computers, it's fucking beautiful and badass.

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    1. A fact so nice you posted twice

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  7. The only thing I hate about MC is the lack of plugs (power outlets) as compared to M3 or QNC.

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  8. MC is built in brutalist style, which means it's supposed to by "ugly". By the way, if you walk into the 6th floor of MC you could be trapped in a maze for hours.

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  9. if you wanted a pretty campus and building, you should have gone to Queens.

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  10. MC, like math itself, is not beautiful in its looks. It may, like math, depress, annoy, and confound people sometimes. Yet like math, if you go beyond its looks and delve into the amazing and awe-inspiring nature of its mathematical splendour, it is truly beautiful.

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